A sample text widget

Etiam pulvinar consectetur dolor sed malesuada. Ut convallis euismod dolor nec pretium. Nunc ut tristique massa.

Nam sodales mi vitae dolor ullamcorper et vulputate enim accumsan. Morbi orci magna, tincidunt vitae molestie nec, molestie at mi. Nulla nulla lorem, suscipit in posuere in, interdum non magna.

Spinach & Strawberry Salad

In keeping with the theme of spring salads, I wanted to find a fresh and delicious way to prepare the abundance of beautiful spinach we have growing in our vegetable trials this year.

Spinach in our vegetable trial plots at the Gurney’s Farm

Spinach in our vegetable trial plots at the Gurney’s Farm

My go-to is usually a traditional spinach salad with bacon, hardboiled eggs, onion and a warm vinaigrette, but I wanted to try something a little lighter. I also wanted to pair the juicy red strawberries which are ripening now with the spinach.   I find that often the fruit and vegetable crops which mature at the same time in the garden complement each other wonderfully in cooking.  My strawberry and spinach combo held true to this observation.  This salad was exceptionally easy to throw together and was so tasty even my picky four-year-old gobbled up her greens.

Green salad with strawberries

Yum!

Spinach and Strawberry Salad

  • 6 cups spinach, torn into bite size pieces
  • 2 cups sliced strawberries
  • ½ cup pecans
  • ½ cup goat cheese crumbled
  • 2 Tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 Tablespoon honey
  • Salt & pepper to taste

Place the spinach, strawberries, pecans and goat cheese into a bowl

Warm the vinegar, olive oil and honey just slightly in a small saucepan and drizzle over the salad

Toss ingredients together & dig in!

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest

Spring Arugula Salad

Arugula was one of the very first things to be ready to eat in the Gurney’s vegetable trials this spring.  I have always loved arugula’s peppery flavor, and it’s become one of my very favorite salad greens.

Arugula

 

In my quest to find new ways to use arugula, I came up with this delightful spring salad.  The slight bitterness of the arugula is complemented by the bright, sweet-sour flavor of grapefruit and the cool- creamy avocado.  Hope you enjoy!

Arugula Salad

 

Arugula, Grapefruit & Avocado Salad

2-3 cups of arugula

¼ of an avocado, diced

1 grapefruit, peeled, de-seeded and diced

3-4 spears of asparagus, lightly steamed or raw, and cut into bite-size pieces (optional, but highly recommended)

1 tablespoon of red onion or green onion, minced

1 tablespoon of orange juice

1 tablespoon of olive oil

1 teaspoon of sesame seeds

Sea salt and cracked pepper to taste

Combine arugula, avocado, grapefruit and onion in a bowl. Drizzle with orange juice and olive oil.  Sprinkle with sesame seeds and toss everything together.  Add salt and pepper to your liking.

Adding grilled salmon to this salad makes an especially tasty addition, and it’s filling enough to serve for dinner!

 

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest

The Gurney’s Farm Welcomes Spring

Spring is in full swing at the Gurney’s farm. We are preparing for planting, watching the bees visit sweet blooms and anticipating the garden harvests in the months to come.   Here’s a quick overview of what’s happening now!

Tomato and lettuce seedlings are growing in our Gurney’s Seed Starting Kit.

Tomato and lettuce seedlings are growing in our Gurney’s Seed Starting Kit.

Trays and trays of tomato seedlings are eagerly awaiting their time to be transplanted in our Research & Development Greenhouse.

Trays and trays of tomato seedlings are eagerly awaiting their time to be transplanted in our Research & Development Greenhouse.

RazzMatazz™ Grape overwintered beautifully in a whiskey barrel planter.

RazzMatazz™ Grape overwintered beautifully in a whiskey barrel planter.

The pollinating insects are going crazy over the overwintered mustard that is now in bloom.

The pollinating insects are going crazy over the overwintered mustard that is now in bloom.

Peas are popping up in a 7-gallon Grow Tub.

Peas are popping up in a 7-gallon Grow Tub.

We are growing a wide assortment of plants in our Grow Tub trials.

We are growing a wide assortment of plants in our Grow Tub trials.

The Li’l-BIG Apple Tree that we planted in a 20-gallon Grow Tub is now blooming.  The bees love these sweet –smelling blossoms.

The Li’l-BIG Apple Tree that we planted in a 20-gallon Grow Tub is now blooming. The bees love these sweet –smelling blossoms.

We’ve prepped the area for our tomato trials. We’ll set out the plants in the next week or two.

We’ve prepped the area for our tomato trials. We’ll set out the plants in the next week or two.

Delectable asparagus spears are popping up in our asparagus variety trials.

Delectable asparagus spears are popping up in our asparagus variety trials.

Lush, leafy rhubarb is looking fantastic in our rhubarb variety trials.

Lush, leafy rhubarb is looking fantastic in our rhubarb variety trials.

Strawberry blossoms mean fruit’s not far off.

Strawberry blossoms mean fruit’s not far off.

Here’s a gorgeous planting of Solomon’s Seal.

Here’s a gorgeous planting of Solomon’s Seal.

Iris are beginning to bloom.

Iris are beginning to bloom.

Peonies are also making an appearance!

Peonies are also making an appearance!

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest

Brussels Sprouts—A Winter Garden Treat

We’re finally experiencing weather that resembles winter, but that doesn’t mean our garden harvests are over!  The kale trials look beautiful; some of our lettuces seem to be enjoying the cold; and the Brussels sprouts are at their peak.

Brussel Sprouts We’ve received just enough frosty weather to really bring out the delectable sweetness in the sprouts.  I’ve brought some Brussels sprouts-based dishes to both Thanksgiving and Christmas celebrations, and everyone was quite impressed with what a tasty dish this lowly vegetable can be!

One of my favorites is an unassuming Brussels sprouts and sweet potato hash.  I like it because you can pair the sweet potatoes you have in storage with the sprouts you pick in the early winter. Plus the sweet creaminess of the sweet potatoes really complements the flavor of the sprouts.

And it’s as easy as chopping your sprouts in quarters, roughly chopping your sweet potatoes, throwing everything in a cast iron skillet with some butter or olive oil, and cooking to your liking.

I prefer to cook until the potatoes and sprouts get golden brown and caramelized. This dish is excellent as is with some salt and cracked pepper, or you can cook some eggs over the top or even mix in some bacon for extra deliciousness!

Another delicious, easy and just slightly dressier dish is:

Pan Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Bacon, Red Onions and Hazelnuts

  • 4-5 cups sliced or chopped Brussels sprouts
  • 1 lb. bacon
  • 1/2 to 1 red onion diced (depending on how much you like onion)
  • 1 cup chopped hazelnuts
  • ½ teaspoon nutmeg
  • Salt & pepper to taste

Cooking Brussels Sprouts with Bacon Cook bacon in a large, cast iron skillet. Transfer bacon to a paper towel-lined plate, leaving the bacon drippings in the pan. Add onions and cook until soft (about 5 minutes).

Add Brussels sprouts and cook until they are tender-crisp and bright green (about 10 minutes depending on how thickly you’ve chopped or sliced them).

During the last few minutes of cooking, crumble bacon and add bacon and hazelnuts to the pan with the Brussels sprouts.  Sprinkle with nutmeg, salt and pepper to taste. Enjoy!

What are some of your favorite Brussels sprouts-based dishes?  I’d love to hear how you’ve been enjoying your sprouts.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest

The Gurney’s Farm

Before fruit, vegetable and flower varieties are sold in our catalog, they’re grown and tested at the Gurney’s Farm. Tucked amidst corn and soybean fields in Tipp City, Ohio (Zone 6), the 20-acre test farm includes an orchard, vineyard, brambles, various berry plantings, ornamental beds and a large vegetable garden.

Vegetable garden at the Gurney’s Farm

Vegetable garden at the Gurney’s Farm

One of the ornamental beds at the Gurney’s Farm

One of the ornamental beds at the Gurney’s Farm

We have two greenhouses that we use to extend the growing season. It’s also where we start most of our seedlings before transplanting them to the garden. A space dedicated to container trials allows us to grow fruit and vegetable varieties in Grow Tubs and determine which ones are best suited for container gardening.

Each year, we search for the best new varieties for our catalog. Finding the best means we must grow and test hundreds of plants. Our fruits and vegetables are grown with very little, if any pesticides, and we try to mimic home garden conditions. We do this because we want to know how each variety holds up to stressors like pests, diseases and inclement weather. When growing our ornamental plants, we don’t pamper them. We want to find the plants that perform best without lots of extra work.

A panoramic view of the greenhouses and barns

A panoramic view of the greenhouses and barns

How do we determine what to trial and test in our gardens? A dedicated group of horticulturalists work at our farm and devote their time to finding new and exciting plants. Throughout the year they visit plant breeders, universities, public gardens, horticultural classes, trade shows and field trials.

When they find interesting plants, they bring them to the research farm where we test how they perform in the field. Our Gurney’s team also conducts its own plant breeding and selection work at the research farm. This allows us to focus on the exact qualities we want to offer.

While we test and trial hundreds of varieties each year, very few of them are selected for our catalog. We are a choosey bunch of gardeners, and if the trial plants don’t reach our standards, we simply will not offer them to our customers.

The raised bed garden, combining edibles and ornamentals

The raised bed garden, combining edibles and ornamentals

Gurney’s has an extensive list of qualities that each plant must possess before we’ll consider putting it into our catalog. Superior flavor tops the list for edibles. If a fruit or vegetable variety has great flavor, then we examine additional traits, such as how easy or difficult the plant was to grow, its yields, disease and pest resistance, and overall appearance.  For ornamentals we also look at ease of growth,  disease and pest resistance, and overall appearance—but we find ourselves paying special attention to plants that attract bees and other beneficial insects, flowers that are especially easy to grow from seed and native plants.

Through the active spring, summer and fall growing season, our horticulture team inspects the plants frequently; we photograph the plants and take notes on how they are performing; we meet and discuss which varieties are impressive and which ones fall short.

We also conduct several types of taste tests. During blind taste tests, we’ll try several different varieties and note their flavor and texture. We also taste test produce right off the plant. Many a summer day you’ll find us in the vegetable garden or out in the orchard with juice dripping from our chins; we’ll have notes in one hand and a knife in the other.

Our gardening team also tries our test varieties in recipes. This helps us determine what varieties are best for fresh eating, best for baking, best for grilling, and so on.

Gurney's Farm Staff

Some of the crew, participating in apple taste tests

Picking trial apples from the orchard

Picking trial apples from the orchard

We could fill our research farm with new vegetables, fruits and landscape plantings every year and always want more.  When the time comes to make our wish list for the year, we often have to make cuts, as we tend to get carried away with all the wonderful new varieties we want to trial. Like you, we are passionate about gardening. One of the things we love most is that there is always more to learn, more to explore, more to create and more to eat!

Ornamental bed at Gurney's

An ornamental bed and lunch break area

First signs of spring at Gurney's farm!

The first signs of spring at the Gurney’s Farm orchard

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest

Juliet Dwarf Cherry – How do I love thee, let me count the ways

Dwarf cherries—like Juliet, Romeo and Carmine Jewel—are real breakthroughs in cherry trees. They represent over 50 years of breeding work, begun in the 1940’s by Dr. Les Kerr.

Dwarf cherries manage to combine the best of all cherry worlds. These outstanding trees have the compact plant size and excellent hardiness of Mongolian cherries (Prunus fruticosa—a medium-sized suckering shrub with edible, cherry-like fruit), the heavy fruiting capabilities of sour cherries and the sugar levels and texture of a sweet cherry.

Bred in Zone 2B (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan), dwarf cherries will survive winter lows of -40 F without damage and begin bearing within 3 years of planting. Harvests of 20-30 pounds of fruit are typical by the time a dwarf cherry reaches 5 years old.

Easy to pick, dwarf stature of an 8 year old Dwarf Cherry bush

Easy to pick, dwarf stature of an 8 year old Dwarf Cherry bush

Because of their compact size, it’s so much easier to grow, care for and harvest cherries from dwarf cherry trees than traditional cherry trees. Dwarf cherry trees usually mature at 6 feet tall, although it can range from 5-8 feet. This means the cherries are easily within reach when harvesting. While Juliet is not bothered by too many pests or diseases, birds do love her fruits. We highly recommend netting the bushes after fruit turns red.

Covering a Juliet Dwarf Cherry with Premium Bird Netting to protect cherries from hungry birds

Covering a Juliet Dwarf Cherry with Premium Bird Netting to protect cherries from hungry birds

While their smaller size makes them easy to incorporate into any landscape, dwarf cherries also work beautifully in a container.  Ornamental showy white blooms appear in the spring and glossy green foliage provides the perfect backdrop for jewel-like red fruit in the summer.

                                                                  Easy to grow in a container- covered in spring bloom.

Easy to grow in a container- covered in spring bloom.

Dwarf cherry blossoms.

Dwarf cherry blossoms.

We currently offer 3 varieties of exceptional dwarf cherries:  Juliet, Romeo and Carmine Jewel.  Carmine Jewel is a great variety for drying; Romeo is tops for juice, wine and jellies; Juliet truly is the tastiest of the dwarf cherry bunch.  While she’s a superb cherry for fresh eating, don’t expect the exact same experience as popping a Bing cherry into your mouth. While Juliet’s sugar levels are actually higher than a sweet cherry like Stella or Bing, Juliet also has a much higher acid level. With Juliet, you get a more complex, sweet-tart, taste sensation!

One thing to keep in mind with Juliet cherry is that there is quite a variance in fruit color as the cherries ripen.  Though the cherries on the right are simply gorgeous to gaze upon, the fruits on the left are actually at their peak ripeness and flavor levels.

The cherries on the left are at peak ripeness, the cherries on the right are not ripe yet.

The cherries on the left are at peak ripeness, the cherries on the right are not ripe yet.

While Juliet cherries are fantastic for fresh eating, don’t stop just there.  I’ve found that they freeze beautifully, retaining their texture, color and flavor. Half-thawed Juliet cherries spread over the top of premium vanilla ice cream and sprinkled with dark chocolate shavings is an indulgence you must try.

Juliet cherries also make an excellent ice cream or gelato. Their rich sweet-tart flavor complements the creamy sweetness of the ice cream base, while their rich red color creates the most beautifully pink-tinted ice cream.

For a slightly healthier treat, try Juliet cherries in a low-fat sorbet or blended into your favorite smoothie recipe. They also work wonders in traditional baked goods such as pies, crisps and clafaoutis  (a traditional French desert made with fruit covered with a thick flan-like batter. It’s very easy and very delicious).

Lovely pink Juliet gelato- tastes as good as it looks.

Lovely pink Juliet gelato- tastes as good as it looks.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest

The New Gurney’s Spring 2016 Catalog

The New Gurney’s Spring 2016 pre-season catalog is arriving in mailboxes everywhere—and we have lots of new fruits and veggies for spring. While it’s hard to pick a favorite, I’ll share a few that really stand out.

Note: If you didn’t receive a catalog, just click here to request yours!

AsparaBest® Asparagus—I love all asparagus in any shape, form or variety, so AsparaBest has perhaps an unfair advantage. But with 2 to 3 times the production of the common Jersey asparagus varieties, AsparaBest is a shoe-in for my home garden. I garden in Zone 6, so cold hardiness in asparagus is not a huge issue for me. Gardeners who struggle with hardiness will love AsparaBest! It was developed in Ontario and bred to be late emerging and extremely cold hardy. It’s perfectly sweet, tender and tasty, all while offering outstanding health benefits including high levels of Vitamins K, B, C and E, folic acid, copper and selenium.

Asparabest

Chocolate Sprinkles Hybrid Tomato—We’ve been trialing striped tomatoes for the last 5 years in hopes of finding one worth the effort of growing. Most of our efforts ended with flavorless, unexciting fruit that cracked and rotted.  This past summer we trialed Chocolate Sprinkles and for the first time were rewarded with beautiful brick red and green striped fruit that resisted cracking and disease. With delightful flavor, it quickly became my favorite variety for snacking and salads. The yields on this one are phenomenal, so be prepared for a lot of tomato enjoyment!

Chocolate Sprinkles Hybrid Tomato

Honeygold Hybrid Corn—With so many great corn varieties on the market, it’s sometimes hard to choose. While Gotta Have It remains my perennial favorite, I fell in love with Honeygold at last years’ sweet corn variety trials. With big, striking golden ears, Honeygold packs a flavorful punch. I find that some modern hybrids are almost too sugary sweet for my tastes and lack any real depth of flavor. But Honeygold combines the right level of sweetness with a rich, robust corn flavor for a truly fantastic eating experience. The large ears have very deep kernels—so you really feel like you’re sinking your teeth into something when you eat it. These nice deep kernels make Honeygold a great variety for freezing as well.  I typically cut all my corn off the cob before freezing and ended up with a very high volume of cut kernels with Honeygold.

Casper Hybrid Eggplant– I was struck by this variety when I first tried it in California field trials. The breeder cut off a hunk of the raw eggplant and handed it to me. I wasn’t exactly looking forward to eating raw eggplant, but I was pleasantly surprised. It was mellow, silky and even a bit sweet. The next year we planted it in our trials in Ohio. These lovely creamy white eggplants converted even eggplant haters with their pleasing texture and superb flavor. Casper was excellent sautéed and is my favorite variety for placing on skewers and grilling with onions, squash and tomatoes.

Casper Eggplant

Purple Queen Improved Bush Bean—You could grow these beautiful, glossy, deep purple beans just for aesthetic appeal.  The plants are lovely, with rich green foliage tinged with deep purple, and the lavender blooms herald the way for deep violet beans.  This variety would make a lovely addition to a mixed edible/ornamental bed or patio containers. But Purple Queen Improved is not just a pretty face, it was a real workhorse in our trials. Yields were far better than older purple varieties we compared it to, and plants remained healthy when others began to falter.

Purple Queen Improved Bush Bean

Chiffon Hybrid Summer Squash—Sometimes it’s hard to get excited about summer squash and zucchini.  You plant it; it grows; you end up with so many squash that you’re leaving them on your neighbor’s porch in the middle of the night to try to get rid of them (or maybe that’s just me).  They all pretty much taste the same.  So when everyone that tried Chiffon in our 2014 trials remarked on what a nice variety it was, I took notice. The pretty creamy yellow fruit (almost the same color as the light, fluffy chiffon cake) caught my eye. Then I noticed how healthy and attractive the deep green, compact plants appeared compared to others in our trials. But the clincher came after tasting the squash. With tender, delicate texture and thin skin I thought Chiffon would just turn to mush when I cooked it. But it cooked up delightfully, and the flavor was superb. Sautéed with a bit of olive oil and sea salt, Chiffon simply cannot be beat. By the way, yields are so high, you still might resort to leaving squash on your neighbors’ doorsteps, so be forewarned.

Summer Squash

Full Moon Hybrid Honeydew—Let me start out with the statement that, as of a year ago, I would have sworn, “I HATE honeydew melons.”  One of the few things I will not eat, I’ve been guilty of picking them out of fruit salads, even going so far as to completely avoid them in those self-serve breakfast buffets. I’d take all the grapes and pineapple instead and leave some poor soul with a bowl full of hard, tasteless green chunks.  Full Moon changed all that for me. Tender, sweet, juicy and downright addictive, I was caught red-handed in our melon trials eating Full Moon melons with my bare hands.  Perhaps the most remarkable thing about this melon is that we actually got melons. The past 3-4 years have been really tough on our melon trials. Between disease, poor weather conditions and insects, we’ve barely gotten a crop off the many varieties that we’ve trialed.  But Full Moon came through with shining performance.  Laughing at weather, pests and disease, the full, vigorous vines gave us a beautiful melon harvest in the midst of a lot of other varieties’ dead vines and rotting, immature fruit.  To say I was impressed would be an understatement!

Full Moon Hybrid Honeydew

Mara Des Boise Strawberry—Sweet, delicious little bursts of heaven… and only 6 or so more months to wait for fresh strawberries!  Mara may be slightly smaller in size, but she makes up for it in flavor.  Some call this the perfect strawberry, with its rich floral sweetness and intense aroma reminiscent of wild strawberries. No need to add sugar, as Mara is one of, if not THE sweetest berry out there. I’m sure it would make a delicious jam, but I’ve never been able to stop all the berries from getting eaten up fresh, right out of the garden. With a soft, juicy texture, don’t look for Mara to show up in grocery stores. It does not ship well, but it makes a perfect variety for the home garden where it can be enjoyed freshly picked.

Juliet Dwarf Cherry—A cherry by any other name would not taste as sweet!  Juliet truly is the tastiest of the dwarf cherry bunch.  She’s a superb cherry for fresh eating, but don’t expect the same experience as popping a Bing cherry in your mouth. While Juliet’s sugar levels are actually higher than a sweet cherry like Stella or Bing, the difference is in the acid. Juliet has much higher acid levels, so you get a more complex, sweet-tart, taste sensation!  Juliet’s virtues are too many to extol here, so please stay tuned for my next post focusing on Juliet – “How do I love thee, let me count the ways”!

Juliet Dwarf Cherry

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest

Black Futsu Pumpkin

This summer, we grew Black Futsu, a highly ornamental and tasty pumpkin that’ll we’ll be offering to Gurney’s customers in Spring 2016. Black Futsu has a flattened round shape, deep ridges and a rind color that ranges from dusky orange to powdery blue to deep rich chestnut brown. The rich orange flesh is drier than and less sweet than many pumpkins and lends itself wonderfully to savory dishes. It’s been compared to the rich flavor of toasted hazelnuts.

Black Futsu is also lovely as an ornamental, lending itself perfectly to fall displays. It holds up extremely well in storage, so you can use them in your Halloween décor and then store them until use in your favorite pumpkin recipes. They’ll store well until midwinter. Look for this pumpkin in our new item selections for Gurney’s Spring 2016!

Black Futsu Pumpkins in Autumn Displays

Black Futsu Pumpkins in Autumn Displays

Just in time for pumpkin season, our farm manager shared her mouth-watering recipe for Stuffed Black Futsu Pumpkin.

She says “I thought it was pretty amazing. I was just going to roast and pulp it for other recipes, but when I cut the tops off and scooped it out, it was begging to be stuffed. I made up the attached recipe based on what I had on hand. I’m usually not big on eating pumpkin or winter squash unless it is baked into something (think chocolate chip muffins), but this had a different flavor. It was also gorgeous as a fall decoration. I had one sitting in my kitchen and everyone who walked into the house commented on how cool it looked. It seems to store well and tastes great. Also, the seeds were nice and tender, and the kids devoured them in a matter of minutes of toasting!”

Vegetarian Stuffed Black Futsu Pumpkin:

  • 2 pumpkins (tops removed and seeded)
  • 1 cup cooked wild rice
  • 1 leek, chopped
  • ½ cup corn (fresh or frozen)
  • 1 sweet pepper (chopped)
  • 2 cloves garlic (minced)
  • ¼ cup fresh parsley
  • ¼ cup goat cheese
  • 1 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 tablespoon butter

Stuffed Pumpkin

Stuffed Pumpkin

 

Slice tops of pumpkins, scoop out seeds and stringy pulp.  Save the tops to use as lids and save the seeds for toasting.  Discard pulp.  Mix all ingredients except butter in a large bowl.  Divide stuffing mix equally among the two pumpkins, filling the cavities.  Top each stuffing mix with a pat of butter and cap with the pumpkin tops.  Roast in the oven at 400 degrees for about an hour.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest

Gurney’s Farm Update- The Fall Garden

The temperatures are finally cooling off, the leaves are changing, and I’m finding big, fat garden spiders draped all over the landscape. It’s official, fall is here!  While in some aspects I’m suffering from garden burnout after tending to my garden (and its weeds) all spring and summer, I still want to reap the bounties that a fall garden has to offer.

Fall is the perfect time for an extra crop of nutritious leafy greens, root crops and Brussels sprouts (just to name a few). And, until your ground freezes solid, you can plant garlic to your heart’s content.

At the Gurney’s farm we are enjoying some late summer-planted bulb fennel.  The attractive ferny fronds can double as an ornamental and are delightful for adding an anise flavor to recipes.  The bulbs make a sweet and crunchy addition to salads and are lovely for roasting.

Bulb Fennel

Bulb Fennel at the Gurney’s Farm

Our basil crop is looking beautiful this fall.  We’re especially excited about this new variety with purple blooms and excellent flavor.  It performed well for us all season, and even held up to the terrible Downy Mildew that hit many other varieties hard. Look for this variety to make its debut in a future Gurney’s catalog!

New Purple-Flowered Basil

New Purple-Flowered Basil

We’re also looking forward to the harvest of our fall-planted beet and radishes.  We planted in a raised bed this year, as our hard clay soil often makes growing root crops difficult.  We’re testing a new baby beet and several quick maturing radishes.  Radishes make an excellent last minute fall crop, since many varieties can be ready to harvest in 3 weeks and they prefer cooler temperatures.

Radish and Beet Seedlings

Radish and Beet Seedlings

In the coming months we’ll have our hands (and bellies) full with our Brussels sprouts trials.  We’re growing 4 different varieties this year with attributes ranging from bite size, super-sweet, kid-friendly sprouts to plants with very large sized, richly flavored sprouts.

In our area, Brussels sprouts often reach their peak flavor after several frosts have enhanced their sweetness—or around Thanksgiving time. And what perfect timing, as a side dish of roasted Brussels sprouts is perfect Thanksgiving fare!

Brussels Sprouts Trials

Brussels Sprouts Trials

We’ll also be looking at cabbage, broccoli, greens, onions, leeks, cauliflower and kohlrabi as the season progresses. This winter, we’re hoping to use row covers and mulch and try our hand at some overwintering trials.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest

Making early applesauce

I’m making applesauce today from the Pristine apples we recently harvested at the Gurney’s farm.  Introduced by Purdue University in the 1990’s, Pristine is still one of the highest-quality, early apples on the market.

Typically ripening in July (we were a little late this year due to a cooler-than-normal start to the summer), Pristine exhibits pretty, pale to bright yellow skin, sometimes with a slight blush and creamy flesh.  It’s a good fresh-eating apple if picked at its peak. It is crisp and juicy with a mild, sweet-tart flavor and far exceeds the eating quality of other early apples such as Yellow Transparent.  Its only drawback is that is in not a great storage apple. It only holds 2-4 weeks without losing quality. So you’re often left with a large crop of apples (far more than I could ever eat fresh in a couple of weeks) that will need to be preserved in some way.

While you can use Pristine for drying or baking, it is truly a great sauce apple.  Its tender texture cooks up fast, and its skin is so thin and tender you don’t need to peel the apples prior to saucing.  Here’s how I make my Pristine applesauce:

Clean the apples

Because I don’t peel my apples for sauce, I make sure to wash them quite well. I like to put a few drops of Dr. Bronner’s liquid castile soap in my sink and let the apples soak for a while, then scrub and rinse.   White vinegar in water also works well for a fruit bath.

Pristine Apples

Chop the apples

Since I don’t peel, all I have to do is quarter, remove the core and seeds and roughly chop my apples before throwing them in a large cooking pot.

Applesauce apples

Cook & Blend

I add a little water just to keep the apples from sticking to the bottom of the pan, cook on low for about 30 minutes and then smoosh up all my cooked apples. I’ve used a stick blender, thrown the cooked apples in a blender or used the apple screen for the Food Strainer and Sauce Maker, all with great success.  If you like your applesauce extra chunky you can even just mash it up with a spoon and be done with it.  Just be very careful if you’re trying to blend up your boiling hot apples.  I still have a nickel-sized scar on my hand from when hot applesauce splashed out of the pot and landed on me!

Can, Freeze & Enjoy

Applesauce is one of the first things I learned to can and is quite easy to process.  If I’m really in hurry I’ve also found that it works quite well just to ladle it into freezer bags and throw in the deep freeze.   Most of my family loves applesauce with a sprinkle of cinnamon, but I have what is probably the only 3 year old who does not like it.  I use a lot of applesauce blended with other fruit to make delicious homemade fruit leathers as a treat.  It also works wonders in bread, cookie and muffin recipes. However you use your applesauce, I’m sure it will be delicious.

Best apples for sauce

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest